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Toyoda Gosei Accelerates Development of Steering Wheels with HMI Functions
Launch of truck steering wheels that warn drivers of inattention or drowsiness from September

November 27, 2018

Kiyosu, Japan, November 27, 2018: Toyoda Gosei Co., Ltd. is advancing its development of steering wheels with human-machine interface (HMI) functions for the exchange of information between humans and automobiles.

Toyoda Gosei began selling truck steering wheels that warn drivers of inattention or drowsiness to TG Logistics Co., Ltd. in September of 2018. Trial use is also underway at Nagoya Toubu Rikuun and other freight companies. A camera in the steering wheel monitors the driver’s face and alerts the driver when inattention or drowsiness are detected. These steering wheels can be retrofitted and are expected to contribute to the prevention of accidents involving trucks*, which are more likely to cause severe damage.

Toyoda Gosei’s steering wheels with grip sensor, which can be used with today’s advanced driver assistance systems, also reached the stage of commercial application. Sensors in the grip portion of the steering wheel can detect with high sensitivity whether the driver is gripping the steering wheel. If a driver releases the steering wheel while driving, he or she is alerted with a sound and visual warning.

Based on the development of these steering wheels, Toyoda Gosei will continue to refine its technologies to improve the functions of steering wheels that are a key point of contact between humans and automobiles. The company is thereby advancing the development of modular products that will contribute to the creation of safer and more comfortable vehicles in the age of autonomous driving,.

*Tests of over 100,000 kilometers in total have been conducted with the trucks of TG Logistics. These steering wheels have demonstrated a stable effect in reducing the number of times that drivers take their eyes off of the road for 2 or more seconds, which increases the risk of accidents.